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Impact modifiers: (2) modifiers for engineering thermoplastics

  • C. A. CruzJr.
Part of the Polymer Science and Technology Series book series (POLS, volume 1)

Abstract

Engineering plastics are broadly defined as melt-processable thermoplastics capable of maintaining their dimensional stability and most of their mechanical properties above 100°C and below 0°C [1]. They are generally regarded as light weight substitutes for metals and for the more common types of construction materials used in structural and high performance applications. Growth in engineering plastics has come from the following widely used commercial resins:
  • • bisphenol-A polycarbonate, a clear and tough plastic;

  • • polyacetal (polyoxymethylene), a hard crystalline polymer with fatigue resistance and a low friction coefficient;

  • • polyamides (nylon 6 and nylon 6,6), both with good chemical and abrasion resistance, used in a variety of structural and automotive applications;

  • • polyesters — poly(butylene terephthalate), PBT, used in automotive and electrical and electronic applications; and poly(ethylene terephthalate), PET, the latter especially interesting due to its recyclability.

Keywords

crazing engineering resins impact modifiers impact strength nylon 6 nylon 6,6 polycarbonate poly(butylene terephthalate) poly(ethylene terephthalate) polyester shear yielding toughening Izod Charpy alloys 

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References

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    Clagett, D.C. (1986) Engineering Plastics, in Encyclopaedia of Polymer Science and Engineering (eds H.F. Mark, N.M. Bikales, C.G. Overberger, G. Menges and J.I. Kroschwitz) J. Wiley & Sons, New York, Vol. 6, p. 94.Google Scholar
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    Yee, A.F. (1986) Impact Resistance, in Encyclopedia of Polymer Science and Engineering (eds H.F. Mark, N.M. Bikales, CG. Overberger, G. Menges and J.I. Kroschwitz) J. Wiley & Sons, New York, Vol. 8, p. 36.Google Scholar
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    Borgrevve, R.J.M., Gaymans, R.J. and Eichenwald, H.M. (1989) Polymer, 30, 78.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. A. CruzJr.

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