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Spirit and Generativity: The Role and Contribution of the Phenomenologist in Hegel and Husserl

  • Anthony Steinbock
Chapter
Part of the Phaenomenologica book series (PHAE, volume 148)

Abstract

In this article I treat the role and contribution of the phenomenologist, and the phenomenologist’s relation to history. This may seem to be a straightforward enough topic. After all, isn’t the role of the phenomenologist to describe the phenomena, whatever they may be? Isn’t his or her contribution the uninterested articulation of what he or she sees ? As many know the situation is actually much more complex than this, for just what the phenomena are depends, at least in the case of Husserlian phenomenology, upon the methodological strategy or strategies employed: whether one investigates the phenomena within an ontological or constitutive framework, or from static, genetic, or generative research perspectives. In fact, it is precisely this last mentioned dimension — the generative dimension — that motivates the question concerning the role and contribution of the phenomenologist.

Keywords

Transcendental Phenomenology Transcendental Philosophy Cross Cultural Communication Phenomenological Philosopher Husserlian Phenomenology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1998

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  • Anthony Steinbock

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