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Man-Machine Cooperation for the Control of an Intelligent Powered Wheelchair

  • G. Bourhis
  • Y. Agostini
Chapter
Part of the International Series on Microprocessor-Based and Intelligent Systems Engineering book series (ISCA, volume 18)

Abstract

The usefulness of electric wheelchairs no longer needs to be demonstrated. Of course they bring mobility autonomy to people with severe motor disability, but also help the cognitive development of disabled children [1]. However their use may be difficult or impossible for some persons due to excessively weak residual physical capacities, a serious spasticity or cognitive impairments. For instance, some people with tetraplegia only have access to an on-off sensor. This makes controlling a wheelchair particularly difficult, especially for delicate manoeuvres: the only possibility consists in selecting the choices “forward-backward-left-right” on screen or on a LED scanning device.

Keywords

Obstacle Avoidance Manual Mode Perception Task Ultrasonic Sensor Navigation Task 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Bourhis
    • 1
  • Y. Agostini
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratoire d’Automatique des Systèmes CoopératifsUniversité de Metz, Ile du SaulcyMETZ Cedex 01France

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