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Increased Autonomy in Industrial Robotic Systems: A Framework

  • Gunar Bolmsjö
  • Magnus Olsson
  • Krister Brink
Chapter
Part of the International Series on Microprocessor-Based and Intelligent Systems Engineering book series (ISCA, volume 18)

Abstract

Programming of industrial robots by traditional methods results in sequential programs with predefined actions. The programs are in general interpreted by the control system and the actions described in the programs are carried out in the work-cell [12]. It is in most cases possible to attach sensors to the control system for receiving work-cell information. However, in today's industrial robotic systems sensors have limited influence on the present realization of a primitive operation. Moreover, present sensor integration does not support future use of the program in similar tasks. In practice, most problems related to sensors are connected to limited robustness in both the sensor itself and the controlling actions initiated by the controller due to sensor signals. An example of such problems is a laser triangulation sensor used for seam-tracking in arc welding operation where every weld joint with its different geometrical and optical properties need adaptations in the set-up of the sensor.

Keywords

Path Planning Industrial Robot World Model Path Planner Virtual Sensor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gunar Bolmsjö
    • 1
  • Magnus Olsson
    • 1
  • Krister Brink
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of Production and Materials EngineeringLund UniversityLundSweden

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