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A Novel Robotic Snake

  • K. J. Kyriakopoulos
  • K. Sarrigeorgides
  • G. Migadis
Chapter
Part of the International Series on Microprocessor-Based and Intelligent Systems Engineering book series (ISCA, volume 18)

Abstract

In a number of industrial environments, such as nuclear, chemical, power plants etc., the need for an efficient means for inspection and minor repair which can easily approach any part of the plant in remote or inaccessible sites is eminent. Similar needs arise in tasks such as for fire-fighting reconnaissance, maneuvering through the rubble to look for survivors after an earthquake, investigation or minor repair of leaks or other problems in municipal sewer systems or utility tunnels etc. A robotic mechanism could both help in minimizing risks for human personnel and increasing the “in between repairs” time by contacting inspection, surveillance and minor repairs operating in higher temperatures, contaminated environments or narrow spaces of an industrial installation. Additionally, such a robot could be used to efficiently move inside medium and large size pipes during inspection, clean up or minor repair tasks.

Keywords

Mobile Robot Nonholonomic System Chained Form Pinion Gear Pfaffian System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. J. Kyriakopoulos
    • 1
  • K. Sarrigeorgides
    • 1
  • G. Migadis
    • 1
  1. 1.Control Systems Laboratory, Department of Mechanical EngineeringNational Technical University of AthensAthensGreece

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