Advertisement

An Omnidirectional Control Algorithm for Walking Machines Based on a Wave-Crab Gait

  • María A. Jiménez
  • P. Gonzalez de Santos
  • J. Tabera
Chapter
Part of the International Series on Microprocessor-Based and Intelligent Systems Engineering book series (ISCA, volume 18)

Abstract

Legged machines are inherently omnidirectional vehicles, i.e., they have the ability to move in any direction by modifying their foot trajectories and/or leg sequence. The bibliography contains diverse omnidirectional control algorithms, depending on the gait [1]-[6].

Keywords

Transfer Phase Return Time Stability Margin Support Phase Duty Factor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    S. Hirose, “A Study of Design and Control of a Quadruped Walking Vehicles”, The International Journal of Robotics Research, Vol. 3, No. 2, pp. 113–133, 1984.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    W. J. Lee, A COMPUTER SIMULATION STUDY OF OMNIDIRECTIONAL SUPERVISORY CONTROL FOR ROUGH-TERRAIN LOCOMOTION BY A MULTILEGGED ROBOT VEHICLE, Ph.D. dissertation, Ohio State University, 1984.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    V.R. Kumar and K.J. Waldrom, “Adaptive Gait Control for a Walking Robot”, Journal of Robotics Systems, 6(1), pp. 49–76, 1989.zbMATHCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    D.A. Messuri, OPTIMIZATION OF THE LOCOMOTION OF A LEGGED VEHICLE WITH RESPECT TO MANEUVERABILITY, Ph.D. dissertation, Ohio State University, 1985.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    M. Russell and S.A. Boulevard, “ODEX I: The First Functionoid”, Robotics Age, Vol. 5, No. 5, Sep/Oct, 1983.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    J.K. Lee and S.M. Song, “Path Planning and Gait of Walking Machine in an Obstacle-Strewn Environment”, Journal of Robotic Systems, Vol. 8, No. 6, pp. 801–827, 1991.zbMATHCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    R.B. McGhee and A.A. Frank, “On the Stability Properties of Quadruped Creeping Gaits”, Mathematical Biosciencies, Vol.2, No. 1/2, pp. 67–84, 1986.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    S.M. Song and K.J. Waldron, “An Analytical Approach for Gait Study and Its Applications on Wave Gaits,” The International Journal of Robotics Research, Vol. 6, No. 2, pp. 60–71, Summer, 1987.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    C. Zhang, and S.M. Song, “Stability Analysis of Wave-Crab Gaits of a Quadruped,” Journal of Robotics System, 7(2), pp. 243–276, 1990.MathSciNetzbMATHCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    M.A. Jiménez, P. González de Santos, M.A. Armada, “A Four-legged Walking Test Bed,” 1st IFAC International Workshop on Intelligent Autonomous Vehicles, April 18-21, University of Southampton, Hampshire, United Kingdom, 1993.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    M.A. Jiménez and P. González de Santos, “Terrain Adaptive Gait for Walking Machines”, Int. J. of Robotics Research, Vol. 16, No. 3, pp. 320–339, June 1997.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    J. M. Martín, R. Ceres, L.A. Pérez, and L. Calderón, “3-D Dynamic Location System by Ultrasonic Techniques,” Technical Report, IAI-CSIC, July, 1993.Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    M. A. Jiménez, GENERATION AND IMPLEMENTATION OF WAVE GAITS FOR QUADRUPED ROBOTS, Ph.D. Thesis, University of Cantabria, Department of Electronic, 1994.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • María A. Jiménez
    • 1
  • P. Gonzalez de Santos
    • 1
  • J. Tabera
    • 1
  1. 1.Departamento de Control AutomáticoInstituto de Automática Industrial (CSIC)Arganda del Rey, MadridSpain

Personalised recommendations