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Political Power and the Indonesian Forest Concession System

  • Sjur Kasa
Part of the World Forests book series (WFSE, volume 1)

Abstract

Indonesian forest concessionaires came under international scrutiny in the late 1980’s as a result of global concern over the world’s remaining tropical moist forests. Indonesia attracted attention because the country has the second largest area of tropical moist forests in the world, and because deforestation rates were high and increasing. As Indonesia had booming plywood and sawnwood industries, and the logging methods employed by these industries were considered to be environmentally destructive, international pressure for a change of policies increased rapidly.

Keywords

Forestry Sector Wood Industry Tropical Moist Forest Forestry Company Residual Stand 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sjur Kasa

There are no affiliations available

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