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African Forests, Societies and Environments

  • Abdallah R. S. Kaoneka
Part of the World Forests book series (WFSE, volume 1)

Abstract

Africa is the largest continent in the world, and possesses a wide range of climatic and soil conditions, together with a very diverse vegetation. Nevertheless, Africa is made up of essentially two regions, tropical (76%) and non-tropical (24%), each with its own climate and vegetation types (FAO 1997).

Keywords

Gross Domestic Product Forest Sector Real Gross Domestic Product Congo Basin Farm Forestry 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Abdallah R. S. Kaoneka

There are no affiliations available

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