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Theories of Deficits in Dyslexia

  • Torleiv Høien
Part of the Neuropsychology and Cognition book series (NPCO, volume 16)

Abstract

Dyslexia is traditionally diagnosed when a child who is developing unremarkably in other respects fails to make normal progress in reading for no apparent reason (Lyon, 1995; Reid, 1995). A question of obvious interest is what causes dyslexia. This question can be addressed at two levels of description: etiology and process.

Keywords

Word Recognition Phonological Awareness Reading Disability Phonemic Awareness Developmental Dyslexia 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Torleiv Høien
    • 1
  1. 1.Reading Research FoundationStavangerNorway

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