Surface Reconstruction from Multiple Views Using Apparent Contours and Surface Texture

  • Geoffrey Cross
  • Andrew Zisserman
Chapter
Part of the NATO Science Series book series (ASHT, volume 84)

Abstract

We describe a novel approach to reconstructing the complete surface of an object from multiple views, where the camera circumnavigates the object. The approach combines the information available from the apparent contour with the information available from the imaged surface texture.

It is demonstrated that this approach of combining two information sources has significant advantages over using either the contour or texture alone: first, the geometric constraints available are complementary, so that the deficiencies of one source can be overcome by the strengths of the other; second, judicious use of the two sources enables an efficient automatic reconstruction algorithm to be developed.

In particular we make the following contributions: it is shown that the set of epipolar tangencies generates an epipolar net at which the visual hull coincides with the surface; a statistical cost function is defined which incorporates terms for error in image intensity similarity and geometric error in the apparent contour; and, an improved photo-consistency constraint is developed for space carving.

Examples of automatically generated texture-mapped graphical models are given for various objects and camera motions. The objects may contain concavities, and have non-trivial topology.

Keywords

Cost Function Surface Reconstruction Geometric Error Multiple View Visual Hull 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Geoffrey Cross
  • Andrew Zisserman

There are no affiliations available

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