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Design for X pp 318-334 | Cite as

Ease-Of-Disassembly Evaluation in Design for Recycling

  • Thomas A. Hanft
  • Ehud Kroll

Abstract

This chapter presents a procedure for evaluating ease-of-disassembly for product recycling. The methodology consists of a spreadsheet-like chart and rating scheme for quantifying disassembly difficulty. Difficulty scores derived from work measurement analysis of standard disassembly tasks provide a means for identifying weaknesses in the design and comparing alternatives. To maximize feedback to the designer, the method captures the sources of difficulty in performing each task. The disassembly evaluation chart is explained and its application is demonstrated in the analysis of a computer keyboard. Derivation of task difficulty scores is described. The current method focuses on manual disassembly of business equipment. However, the same methodology may be applied to robotic disassembly processes and other products.

Keywords

IEEE International Symposium Computer Keyboard Disassembly Sequence Disassembly Process Difficulty Rating 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas A. Hanft
  • Ehud Kroll

There are no affiliations available

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