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Upgrading of Biomass Pyrolysis Liquids to High-Value Chemicals and Fuel Additives

Chapter

Abstract

Upgrading of lignocellulosic by-products to high-value-added chemicals is a very promising R&D activity, but it is at an early stage of development.

Phenols constitute a large fraction of the liquids derived from thermochemically treated biomass and have attracted considerable interest because of their diverse applications. They can be utilized as pure components, blended with other materials, or serve as precursors for the production of many other chemicals.

This paper reviews current activities in the production of high-valueadded chemicals through pyrolysis of biomass, concluding that there are many possibilities and considerable R&D is necessary to develop conversion and extraction techniques.

Keywords

Phenolic Fraction Almond Shell Aromatic Ether Research Octane Number Solar Energy Research Institute 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© ECSC, EEC, EAEC, Brussels and Luxembourg 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Chemical Process Engineering Research InstituteThessalonikiGreece

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