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Seed Management

  • Franklin T. Bonner
Part of the Forestry Sciences book series (FOSC, volume 36)

Abstract

Proper seed management is crucial to southern pine regeneration programs. Almost all seeds will soon be collected from the more than 4,000 ha of seed orchards, where production rates are now about 100 kg/ha for older orchards. Orchard collections can be either multiclone bulk or separate clonal, depending on management objectives. Collection of cones by hand from hydraulic lifts is still the most common technique, but net retrieval systems are used increasingly for loblolly (Pinus taeda L.). New extraction and cleaning systems can produce extremely good seedlots. The most common plant sequence is: (1) scalping of large debris, (2) dewinging, (3) cleaning, and (4) sizing and other conditioning steps. Cleaned lots should be sampled correctly for tests of moisture, purity, weight, and germination. Standard laboratory germination tests are still best, but sound information on seed quality is available from certain rapid tests, such as the measurement of leachate conductivity. Prechill treatments for dormant lots vary by species and sowing environment, but 30 to 60 days is most common for loblolly. If paired tests show extensive dormancy, 60 to 90 days may be best. If tests show low seed vigor, prechill length should be decreased to 20 to 30 days. Southern pines are considered “orthodox” in storage behavior. Seed moisture contents below 10% and temperatures of 2°C are sufficient for storage of 2 to 3 years. For longer storage, -18°C is best.

Keywords

Tree Seed Seed Quality Seed Orchard Hydraulic Lift Pitch Canker 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Franklin T. Bonner

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