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Wildlife Management in Southern Pine Regeneration Systems

  • M. Anthony Melchiors
Part of the Forestry Sciences book series (FOSC, volume 36)

Abstract

Wildlife resources can be integrated into timber management plans for southern pine forests. However, joint production of timber and wildlife resources to meet landowner objectives requires an understanding of forestry-wildlife relationships, wildlife habitat needs, and economic trade-offs. Forest-wildlife management strategies may favor particular species, species richness, or a combination of the two; regardless, habitat diversity among stands and within stands is important. The diversity, abundance, and distribution of forest wildlife depend upon natural site characteristics and manipulation of individual stands within a managed forest. Pine silviculture can provide habitats suitable for most animal species that occur naturally in the southern pine region. Costs associated with forest wildlife management, at the expense of timber production, can be offset by income from fee hunting, which may provide an incentive to integrate wildlife into forest plans. In some instances, joint production of pine timber and wildlife can yield higher revenues than timber production alone.

Keywords

Riparian Zone Prescribe Burning Prescribe Fire Gray Squirrel Southern Forest 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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  • M. Anthony Melchiors

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