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Fertilization of Southern Pines at Establishment

  • Eric J. Jokela
  • H. Lee Allen
  • William W. McFee
Part of the Forestry Sciences book series (FOSC, volume 36)

Abstract

Fertilization is a silvicultural practice used for increasing forestland productivity in the southern U.S. Effective operational use of fertilizers requires diagnostic systems, used individually or in combination, that accurately identify site nutrient status, needs, and potential responsiveness. Interactions of fertilization with other silvicultural practices such as site preparation and genetic tree improvement, and impacts of fertilization on pests, wood quality, and the environment, must be accounted for if fertilizer prescriptions are to be biologically effective and economically justified. This chapter introduces important concepts of forest nutrition and provides guidelines for fertilizing young, intensively managed southern pine plantations.

Keywords

Coastal Plain Soil Group Site Preparation Silvicultural Practice Pitch Canker 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eric J. Jokela
  • H. Lee Allen
  • William W. McFee

There are no affiliations available

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