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Soil and Site Potential

  • Lawrence A. Morris
  • Robert G. Campbell
Part of the Forestry Sciences book series (FOSC, volume 36)

Abstract

Southern pine plantation management centers on the soil resource. This chapter introduces the reader to the major soil groups and soil-vegetation associations of the South. Specific mechanisms through which soil conditions can affect seedling establishment and plantation growth are described and general relationships between soil properties and site quality reviewed. Applications of soils information in projecting plantation yield, selecting species and genotype for planting, choosing equipment, assessing insect and disease hazards, and developing fertilizer and pesticide recommendations are illustrated. Finally, means for manipulating soil conditions to increase production are suggested.

Keywords

Coastal Plain Site Index Site Preparation High Water Table Private Forestry 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lawrence A. Morris
  • Robert G. Campbell

There are no affiliations available

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