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Cretaceous Agglutinated Foraminifera of the UK: A Review

  • Malcolm B. Hart
Chapter
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (ASIC, volume 327)

Abstract

The Cretaceous (Ryazanian-Maastrichtian) succession of the United Kingdom and adjacent areas of the North West European Continental Shelf provides a near-continuous picture of an evolving, mid-latitude agglutinated foraminiferal population. The taxa discussed below to a wide spectrum of genera and while many of these are long-ranging, several species have been incorporated into basin-wide zonations. The dramatic change from a clastic-dominated Early Cretaceous succession to the pelagic chalks of the Late Cretaceous is not reflected in the population at the generic level but is marked at the species level. With the decreasing clastic input up the succession there are quite distinctive changes in the material being used by the agglutinated Foraminifera to construct their tests. The effects of changing sea level, anoxic/dysaerobic events and the diminishing grain size of the sediments are documented with particular attention being given to the very important Late Cenomanian ‘anoxic’ event.

The Cretaceous strata of the United Kingdom are exposed (Fig. 1) in a broad tract of country along the eastern margin of England. South of London much of southern England exposes Cretaceous rocks, especially in the magnificent coastal sections of Kent, Sussex, the Isle of Wight and Dorset. There are also isolated exposures in Northern Ireland and in NW Scotland. Off-shore, in the North Sea Basin, Western Approaches Basin, Celtic Sea Basin and West of Scotland, there are extensive thicknesses of Cretaceous strata, some of which have been drilled as a result of oil exploration.

Keywords

Late Cretaceous Benthic Foraminifera Clay Formation Anoxic Event Oceanic Anoxic Event 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Malcolm B. Hart
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Geological SciencesPolytechnic South WestPlymouth, DevonUK

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