Advertisement

Recent Developments in Medical Ethics in the Methodist Tradition

  • Robert L. Shelton
Chapter
  • 219 Downloads
Part of the Bioethics Yearbook book series (BIYB, volume 1)

Abstract

The spiritual and ecclesiastical descendants of John Wesley have a significant history of concern for individual and social well-being and justice, including health and health care. The Oxford-based group organized by John and Charles Wesley were somewhat derisively dubbed “Methodist” for their methodical approaches to devotional piety, personal morality, and what would now be considered matters of social justice. These “fathers of Methodism…ministered to the physical, intellectual and social needs of the people to whom they preached the gospel of personal redemption” ([4], p. 3). Sometimes taking “forthright positions on controversial issues involving Christian principles”, “early Methodists expressed their opposition to the slave trade, to smuggling, and to the cruel treatment of prisoners” ([27], p. 15). Even though the Methodist Episcopal Church, organized in the United States by the followers of Wesley, was to produce a number of divisions over racial, doctrinal, and ecclesial issues, the general tradition of “Methodism” remains one characterized by a combination of concerns for personal “holiness” or spiritual growth, and personal and societal welfare.

Keywords

Family Planning Service Pastoral Care Supreme Court Decision Indian Health Service Active Euthanasia 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Bibliography

  1. 1.
    Board of Bishops of the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church: 1984, The Quadrennial Episcopal Address, 42nd Session of the General Conference, St. Louis, Mo., July 25-August 3 1984, African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church, Charlotte, North Carolina.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Board of Bishops of the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church: 1988, The Quadrennial Episcopal Address, 43rd Session of the General Conference, Charlotte, N.C., African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church, Charlotte, North Carolina.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Board of Social Concerns, Christian Methodist Episcopal Church: n.d., Denominational Statements on Issues of Social Concern. Christian Methodist Episcopal Church, Atlanta.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    General Conference, Christian Methodist Episcopal Church: 1966, “Social Creed”, in [3], pp. 3–8.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    General Conference, Christian Methodist Episcopal Church: 1978, “Scientific Research”, in [3], pp. 10–11.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    General Conference, Christian Methodist Episcopal Church: 1978, “Euthanasia”, in [3], p. 14.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    General Conference, Christian Methodist Episcopal Church: 1978, “Abortion”, in [3], pp. 14–15.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Clemons, J.: 1987, “Suicide, The Bible and Ethics in Contemporary Society”, Occasional Papers 72, The United Methodist Board of Higher Education and Ministry, Nashville.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Delaney, J., and B. Oliphint (eds.): 1989, Holy Living and Holy Dying - A United Methodist/Roman Catholic Common Statement, Prepared by the General Commission on Christian Unity and Interreligious Concerns of The United Methodist Church and the Bishops’ Committee for Ecumenical and Inter faith Affairs, National Conference of Catholic Bishops, General Board of Global Ministries, Cincinnati.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    The General Conference of The United Methodist Church: 1988, The Book of Resolutions of The United Methodist Church - 1988, The United Methodist Publishing House, Nashville.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    The General Conference of The United Methodist Church: 1988, “AIDS and the Healing Ministry of the Church”, in [10], pp. 101–106.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    The General Conference of The United Methodist Church: 1988, “Federal Funds for Indian Health Services”, in [10], pp. 211–212.Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    The General Conference of The United Methodist Church: 1988, “Genetic Science”, in [10], pp. 213–216.Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    The General Conference of The United Methodist Church: 1984, “Health and Wholeness”, in [10], pp. 235–241.Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    The General Conference of The United Methodist Church: 1980, “Health Care Delivery Policy Statement”, in [10], pp. 241–247.Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    The General Conference of The United Methodist Church: 1984, “Health For All By the Year 2000”, in [10], pp. 247–249.Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    The General Conference of The United Methodist Church: 1980, “Human Rights”, in [10], pp. 445–447.Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    The General Conference of The United Methodist Church: 1976, “Medical Rights for Children and Youth”, in [10], pp. 265–268.Google Scholar
  19. 19.
    The General Conference of The United Methodist Church: 1988, “Mental Health”, in [10], pp. 268–272.Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    The General Conference of The United Methodist Church: 1980, “Opposition to a Call for a Constitutional Convention”, in [10], pp. 458–462.Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    The General Conference of The United Methodist Church: 1984, “Organ and Tissue Donation”, in [10], p. 108.Google Scholar
  22. 22.
    The General Conference of The United Methodist Church: 1980, “Population”, in [10], pp. 283–287.Google Scholar
  23. 23.
    The General Conference of The United Methodist Church: 1976, “Responsible Parenthood”, in [10], pp. 110–112.Google Scholar
  24. 24.
    The General Conference of The United Methodist Church: 1980, “Safety and Health in Workplace and Community”, in [10], pp. 370–373.Google Scholar
  25. 25.
    The General Conference of The United Methodist Church: 1988, “Suicide: A Challenge to Ministry”, in [10], pp. 317–322.Google Scholar
  26. 26.
    The General Conference of The United Methodist Church: 1984, “The Church and Persons With Mentally, Physically and/or Psychologically Handicapping Conditions”, in [10], pp. 279–283.Google Scholar
  27. 27.
    The General Conference of The United Methodist Church: 1988, “The Social Principles”, in [10], pp. 15–36.Google Scholar
  28. 28.
    The General Conference of The United Methodist Church: 1980, “The Status of Women”, [10], pp. 311–316.Google Scholar
  29. 29.
    Iliff Institute: 1989, Reflections on Self-Deliverance, unpublished study papers for The Consultation on Self-Deliverance, Iliff Institute, Denver.Google Scholar
  30. 30.
    Lyons, C.: 1989, Abortion and Responsible Parenthood: The Faithful Witness of a Church to Complex and Critical Issues, Health and Welfare Ministries Department, General Board of Global Ministries, The United Methodist Church, New York.Google Scholar
  31. 31.
    Lyons, C.: 1989, On Not Misrepresenting The Faithful Witness of The Church, Health and Welfare Ministries Department, General Board of Global Ministries, The United Methodist Church, New York.Google Scholar
  32. 32.
    Martin, T., D. Verelli, and M. Lopez: 1989, Brief of the General Board of Church and Society of The United Methodist Church As Amicus Curiae in Support of Petitioners, Nancy Beth Cruzan, by Her Parents and Co-Guardians, Lester L. and Joyce Cruzan, in the Supreme Court of the United States, October, 1989 (includes references to: “Life Abundant: Values, Choices and Health Care, The Responsibility of The Presbyterian Church, U.S.A.”, a Report of the Advisory Council on Church and Society to the 200th General Assembly, 1988, and to “The Covenant of Life and the Caring Community”, Policy Statement of the 195th General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church, U.SA., 1983 ).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert L. Shelton
    • 1
  1. 1.The University of KansasLawrenceUSA

Personalised recommendations