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Aspects of biocontrol of fungal plant pathogens

  • John M. Whipps
  • Mark P. McQuilken
Chapter

Abstract

In recent years there have been considerable changes in attitude towards the use of chemicals in agriculture. Increasing public awareness concerning the quantities and types of chemicals used and their potential impact on the environment has led to more stringent regulations on their use and, in some cases, removal from the market. Consequently, interest has focused on alternatives to chemicals, particularly for pest and disease control. The use of biological disease control measures is one of the strategies available and much experimental work is being carried out to assess its commercial applicability.

Keywords

Biological Control Fungal Plant Pathogen Rhizoctonia Solani Trichoderma Harzianum British Mycological Society 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • John M. Whipps
  • Mark P. McQuilken

There are no affiliations available

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