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The exploitation of microorganisms in the processing of dairy products

  • A. H. Varnam
Chapter

Abstract

The manufacture of cheese, yoghurt and other fermented milks and some types of butter depends on the activity of starter microorganisms. The most important of these, are species of Lactobacillus, Lactococcus, Leuconostoc and Streptococcus which form part of a group commonly referred to as lactic acid bacteria (LAB). Recently, use of a fifth member, Pediococcus, has been proposed (Tzanetakis et al., 1991). A further recent development, stimulated by increased interest in the therapeutic properties of fermented milks is the use of the intestinal organism Bifidobacterium in starter cultures. Properties of starter bacteria are summarized in Table 11.1.

Keywords

Lactic Acid Bacterium Starter Culture Fermented Milk Cheddar Cheese Cottage Cheese 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1993

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  • A. H. Varnam

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