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Optimal economic growth and the conservation of biological diversity

  • Scott Barrett

Abstract

Conservationists are no longer concerned with the extinction of specific species alone, but with the loss of biological diversity generally. There are many reasons why diversity itself should be conserved, but perhaps the most important is the potential contribution of genetic information embodied in the species stock to basic research, particularly in medicine and agriculture.1 Having recognized this potential, the conservation of biological diversity has become an important objective of public policy.2

Keywords

Rain Forest Technical Progress Marginal Benefit Great Basin Island Biogeography 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Scott Barrett

There are no affiliations available

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