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EUV Astronomy with the Rosat wide Field Camera

  • R. S. Warwick
Part of the Astrophysics and Space Science Library book series (ASSL, volume 187)

Abstract

The UK Wide Field Camera (WFC) on ROSAT has carried out the first ever all-sky survey for cosmic sources of extreme ultra-violet (EUV) radiation. A first reduction of the survey data has yielded a catalogue of 383 relative bright EUV sources representing a 30-fold increase in the number of astrophysical objects detected in the ~ 60 — 200 Å band (60–200 eV). The EUV source population is dominated by two classes of object namely white dwarf and active late-type stars, with cataclysmic variables and active galaxies providing minority contributions. At the present time less than 10% of the WFC bright source sample remains optically unidentified. The WFC survey data are currently being used to investigate individual EUV sources, the properties of various EUV-selected source samples and also the distribution of absorbing gas in the local interstellar medium. Aspects of this work are reviewed and recent progress with the final reprocessing of the survey data is also briefly described.

Key words

EUV astronomy active late-type stars white dwarf stars cataclysmic variables supernova remnants the local interstellar medium 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. S. Warwick
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Physics and AstronomyUniversity of LeicesterLeicesterEngland

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