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Shape variation in the rough periwinkle Littorina saxatilis on the west and south coasts of Britain

  • Peter J. Mill
  • J. Grahame
Conference paper
Part of the Developments in Hydrobiology book series (DIHY, volume 111)

Abstract

Variation in the shape of the shell in Littorina saxatilis Olivi has been shown to be due largely to the same variables on both the west and the south coasts of Britain, and it exhibits various clines. Two important aspects are the size of the aperture, which becomes relatively larger from the Isle of Man southwards to Cornwall and eastwards from Devon to the Isle of Wight, and the jugosity of the shell, which increases with distance from Cornwall both northwards as far as the Isle of Man and eastwards as far as Kent. Superimposed on the clines are domains of shape, notably one in Lewis/Harris, where the shells have a relatively large aperture, which is long and narrow, coupled with a rather globose second whorl. The local and geographical aspects of shell shape variation are discussed.

Key words

Littorina saxatilis shape morphometrics clines 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter J. Mill
    • 1
  • J. Grahame
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Pure and Applied BiologyUniversity of LeedsLeedsUK

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