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Higher Education Reform in Indonesia

Integrating New Public Management and national values
  • Hugo Verheul
Part of the The GeoJournal Library book series (GEJL, volume 74)

Abstract

The New Public Management school of thought is an influential model for public sector reform in many countries. Not only countries in the Anglo-Saxon world and continental Europe, but also developing countries in Asia and Africa have followed the NPM principles in the reorganization of their civil services. In developing countries, international aid organizations such as the World Bank and the IMF are believed to be a major driving force for the implementation of NPM-types of public sector restructuring. These organizations see it as a way to rationalize government spending and to increase the effectiveness of specific aid programmes. The question is whether the NPM approach is also applicable in these countries. Its emphasis on market-based models of public service delivery and private sector management techniques may be difficult to transfer to countries with a different institutional orientation.

Keywords

Public Sector High Education System Public Management Reform Process Reform Program 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hugo Verheul

There are no affiliations available

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