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Hertz’s 1884 Theoretical Discovery of Electromagnetic Waves

  • Salvo D’Agostino
Part of the Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science book series (BSPS, volume 213)

Abstract

In his early research on electrodynamics, published in 1884 with the title On the Relations between Maxwell’s Fundamental Electromagnetic Equations and the Fundamental Equations of the Opposing Electromagnetics, 1 Hertz advanced an alternative conception of the electric field:

According to Faraday’s idea, the electric field exists in space independently of and without reference to the methods of its production; whatever therefore be the cause which has produced an electric field, the actions which the field produces are always the same.2

Keywords

Magnetic Force Theoretical Discovery Ponderomotive Force Magnetic Current Magnetic Vector Potential 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

  1. 1.
    Hertz, Wiedemann Annalen 23 (1884) 84–103; Hertz [1896] 273–290.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Hertz [1896] 274.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    D’Agostino [1975] 288 ff. The principle was extended to magnetic forces, in which case it affirms the identity of the loadstone magnetism with that induced by changing electrostatic forces, i.e., by the Maxwellian displacement current.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Hertz [1896] 274.Google Scholar
  5. 6.
    Faraday’s conception is opposite to Helmholtz’s conception of the correlation between matter and force: D’Agostino [1975] 292.Google Scholar
  6. 7.
    Hertz [1896] 274.Google Scholar
  7. 8.
    Hertz [1896] 274.Google Scholar
  8. 9.
    Hertz [1896] 275.Google Scholar
  9. 10.
    Hertz [1896] 276.Google Scholar
  10. 11.
    Hertz [1896] 276.Google Scholar
  11. 12.
    Hertz [1896] 278.Google Scholar
  12. 13.
    Hertz [1896] 279.Google Scholar
  13. 14.
    Hertz [1896] 281. Hertz [1896] 285.Google Scholar
  14. 15.
    Hertz [1896] 284.Google Scholar
  15. 16.
    Hertz [1896] 288.Google Scholar
  16. 17.
    Hertz [1896] 288–289.Google Scholar
  17. 18.
    Hertz [1896] 274.Google Scholar
  18. 19.
    Heinrich Hertz, “On the Finite Velocity of Propagation of Electromagnetic Action”, Sitzungsber. d. Berl. Akad. d. Wiss. (2 February 1888); in Wiedemann’s Ann., 34 [1888], 551; in Hertz [1962] 107–123, 122.Google Scholar
  19. 20.
    E. Aulinger, Wiedemann’s Annalen, 31 [1887] 121.Google Scholar
  20. 21.
    L. Boltzmann, Wiedemann’s Annalen, 31 [1887] 598.Google Scholar
  21. 24.
    Hertz [1896] 288.Google Scholar
  22. 26.
    Hertz [1962]107–123, 122.Google Scholar
  23. 27.
    Hertz [1962] 195–240.Google Scholar
  24. 28.
    Hertz [1962] 236.Google Scholar
  25. 29.
    D’Agostino[1975]316.Google Scholar
  26. 30.
    Hertz [1962] 210: “In the case that ether polarisations and force coincide”.Google Scholar
  27. 31.
    Hertz, Introduction, [1962].25.Google Scholar
  28. 32.
    Hertz [1962] 201, 200.Google Scholar
  29. 33.
    There he defined the velocity of propagation of electric and magnetic oscillations as an “innere Constant” (Hertz [1895] 312).Google Scholar
  30. 34.
    Hertz, “On the Fundamental Equations of Electrodynamics for Bodies at Rest”, Gottinger Nachr. (19 March 1890); in Wiedemann’s Annalen, 40 [1890] 577; Hertz [1962] 195–240.Google Scholar
  31. 35.
    Hertz , “On the Fundamental Equations”, in: Hertz [1962] 196–197.Google Scholar
  32. 36.
    See “Hertz’s experiments on Electromagnetic Waves”, Section 5 B in this book.Google Scholar
  33. 37.
    D’Agostino [1975] 295; Buchwald [1994] 197–198.Google Scholar
  34. 38.
    D’Agostino [1975] 291.Google Scholar
  35. 39.
    Hertz “On Electromagnetic Effects Produced by Electrical Disturbances in Insulators”,in: Hertz [1962] 95–106, 98, 105.Google Scholar
  36. 40.
    Hertz [1962] 288. Also, D’Agostino [1975,] 291.Google Scholar
  37. 41.
    Hoppe [1928] 612.Google Scholar
  38. 42.
    Hoppe [1928] 612.Google Scholar
  39. 43.
    Buchwald [1994] 193–199.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Salvo D’Agostino
    • 1
  1. 1.Università “La Sapienza”RomaItaly

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