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German Electrodynamics in the 1870’s

  • Salvo D’Agostino
Part of the Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science book series (BSPS, volume 213)

Abstract

The most successful developments in mathematical physics in Germany were the various derivations from fundamental principles of Michael Faraday’s electromagnetic induction law of 1831.

Keywords

Free Propagation Dielectric Polarisation Transversal Wave Dielectric Action Aerial Wire 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Salvo D’Agostino
    • 1
  1. 1.Università “La Sapienza”RomaItaly

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