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Abstract

It would be misleading to suggest that the fulness of the English Enlightenment sprang fully armed from the mind of Watts. Behind Voltaire there lay Bayle and the Dutch Arminians. Behind Wolff there lay Francke and the German pietists.1 In like manner, behind Watts lay the philosophical and religious tradition of latitude. But for Watts this tradition was more than something in the air; it was embodied in the educational system of Dissent.

Keywords

Moral Sense Indian Philosopher Aesthetic Sense Philosophical Essay Language Reform 
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References

  1. 11.
    Samuel Wesley, A Letter from a Country Divine to his Friend in London Concerning the Education of the Dissenters in their Private Academies (London, 1703), p. 7.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff, The Hague, Netherlands 1971

Authors and Affiliations

  • John Hoyles

There are no affiliations available

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