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Abstraction and Concreteness

  • Nathan Rotenstreich
Chapter
  • 78 Downloads

Abstract

With regard to the notion that the main concern of philosophy is totality — and we take that notion as expressing Hegel’s view — we may distinguish three major positions. The first is represented by Spinoza. In this position totality qua substance is the point of departure of the metaphysical system. Substance-totality is that which is in itself and is conceived through itself, that is to say, it does not depend on data outside itself. As a matter of fact, there are no data outside the totality. Substance as the beginning of the system is known by the philosopher who reaches the level of intuitive knowledge.1

Keywords

Human Dignity Categorical Imperative Actual Existence High Good Pejorative Sense 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff, The Hague, Netherlands 1974

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  • Nathan Rotenstreich

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