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Bauer’s Conception of Religion and History

  • Zvi Rosen
Part of the Studies in Social History book series (SISH, volume 2)

Abstract

On the face of it, this is a somewhat surprising title. What is the point in classifying these two phenomena — religion and history — together? Religion is the fragmentary expression of man’s being and experience, while the history of mankind contains within it many additional components. But the truth is that for Bauer, religion, until it is abolished and replaced by atheism, plays a central role in the life of men and nation. “The truth is”, Bauer wrote, “that religion shapes the essence of the state, art, etc.; but it is the imperfect and chimeric essence of the imperfect and chimeric state and the unfree essence of unfree art. As the state and art improve, religion ceases to constitute their soul or their principle.”1

Keywords

Human Spirit Universal Force Natural Religion Human Essence Religious Consciousness 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff, The Hague, Netherlands 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zvi Rosen

There are no affiliations available

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