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From Literacy to Lifelong Learning in Tanzania

  • Alix Yule
Part of the Springer International Handbooks of Education book series (SIHE, volume 6)

Abstract

In the thirty-five years since independence Tanzania has struggled to develop an educational system that contributes to national unity and national prosperity. The country is justifiably proud of its progress towards unity, characterized by internal peace and political stability, however, Tanzania’s economy remains among the weakest in Africa.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alix Yule

There are no affiliations available

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