Advertisement

Lifelong Learning Policies in Low Development Contexts: An African Perspective

  • David Atchoarena
  • Steven J. Hite
Part of the Springer International Handbooks of Education book series (SIHE, volume 6)

Abstract

While making lifelong learning a reality for all is fast becoming an attainable goal in the most advanced societies, it still represents a formidable challenge for countries struggling with basic development issues. For developing countries, creating the economic, educational and employment conditions that will provide everyone an opportunity to learn throughout life remains a Utopian ideal. Thus, in low development contexts, changes in the international environment such as the rise of knowledge-based economies and globalization, reinforce the ideal of lifelong learning as one of the primary national goals for the future. In an effort to address both domestic development issues and the impact, both concrete and ideological, of global trends, governments attempt to find new ways of providing essential knowledge and skills to their citizens. In this context, reaching the disadvantaged groups of society represents an increasing concern, particularly in terms of achieving an environment conducive to lifelong learning.

Keywords

Community Participation Informal Sector Basic Education Disadvantaged Group Enrolment Rate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Adamolekun, L., Robert, R.; Laleye, M. (1990), Decentralization policies and socio-economic development in Sub-Saharan Africa. World Bank/Pan African Institute for Development, Douala, Cameroon.Google Scholar
  2. African Development Bank (AfDB). 1998, African Development Report. Oxford University Press, Oxford.Google Scholar
  3. Association for the Development of Education in Africa (ADEA). 1999, Accelerated Literacy for Out-of-School Youth in Francophone West Africa, ADEA, Paris.Google Scholar
  4. Atchoarena, D. (1999), Researching literacy: programmes for young adults (Burkina Faso, Mali, Guinea), Paper presented at the LINS/World Bank seminar, From literacy to adult basic education, Oslo, Norway, June 1999.Google Scholar
  5. Atchoarena, D.; Niameogo, A. (1998), Répondre aux besoins des jeunes défavorisés: quelques expériences en Afrique de l’Ouest. UNESCO/Institut international de planification de l’éducation, Paris.Google Scholar
  6. Bennell, P.; Furlong, D. (1998), Has Jomtien made any difference? Trends in donor funding for education and basic education since the late 1980s. World Development, 26 (1).Google Scholar
  7. Caillods, F. (1998), Education strategies for disadvantaged groups: Some basic ideas. IIEP Contributions: No. 31. UNESCO/International Institute for Educational Planning, Paris.Google Scholar
  8. Carr-Hill, R. A.; Kweka, A. N.; Rusimbi, M. and Chengelele, R. (1991), The functioning and effects of the Tanzanian literacy programme, HEP Research Report No. 93., UNESCO/International Institute for Educational Planning, Paris.Google Scholar
  9. Carron, G.; Carr-Hill, R. A. (1991), Non-formal education: information and planning issues. HEP Research Report No. 90, UNESCO/International Institute for Educational Planning, Paris.Google Scholar
  10. Carron, G.; Ta Ngoc, C. (1996), The quality of primary schools in different development contexts, UNESCO/ International Institute for Educational Planning, Paris.Google Scholar
  11. Chauveau, F. (1998), Stratégies pour les jeunes défavorisés — Etat des lieux en Afrique francophone subsaharienne, UNESCO/Institut international de planification de l’éducation, Paris.Google Scholar
  12. Conférence des Ministres de l’éducation des pays ayant le français en partage (CONFEMEN) (1998), Les facteurs de l’efficacité dans l’enseignement primaire: les résultats du Programme d’Analyse des Systèmes Educatifs (PASEC) sur huit pays d’Afrique, CONFEMEN, Dakar.Google Scholar
  13. Easton, P. (1998), Decentralisation and local capacity development in Sahelian West Africa: Results of the PADLOS education study, Club du Sahel/OECD, Paris.Google Scholar
  14. Esquieu, P.; Peano, S. (1994), L’enseignement privé et spontané dans le système éducatiftchadien, Rapport de recherche de l’IIPE: No. 103. UNESCO/International Institute for Educational Planning, Paris.Google Scholar
  15. Fiaux, M-L.; Niada, F. T. (1997), Analyse transversale de huit expérimentations éducatives au Burkina Faso, Coopération suisse au Développement. Ouagadougou: Bureau de Coopération de l’Ambassade de Suisse.Google Scholar
  16. Hallak, J. (1998), Education and globalisation. IIEP Contributions: No. 26. UNESCO/International Institute for Educational Planning, Paris.Google Scholar
  17. Hamadache, A.; Sow, H. (1997), Evaluation des Centres Nafa en Guinée, Ministère de l’Education nationale et de la Recherche scientifique/UNICEF, Conakry.Google Scholar
  18. Harrison, C; Chisholm, L. (1999), Education and training strategies for disadvantaged youth in South Africa, UNESCO/International Institute for Educational Planning, Paris.Google Scholar
  19. International Consultative Forum on Education For All (ICFEFA). (1998), Wasted opportunities: When schools fail, repetition and drop-out in primary schools, Education for All Status and Trends, UNESCO, Paris.Google Scholar
  20. International Consultative Forum on Education For All (ICFEFA). (1996), Mid-decade review of progress towards Education for All, International Consultative Forum on Education for All, UNESCO, Paris.Google Scholar
  21. International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP). (1998), Basic education in francophone sub-Saharan Africa — Developments since 1990, principal issues, priorities for future action with particular reference to 11 selected countries, A report for the Japan International Co-operation Agency (JICA), UNESCO/ International Institute for Educational Planning, Paris.Google Scholar
  22. International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP). (1997), Alternative education strategies for disadvantaged groups, UNESCO/International Institute for Educational Planning, Paris.Google Scholar
  23. International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP). (1991), The Kenya literacy programme: a view from below, UNESCO/International Institute for Educational Planning, Paris.Google Scholar
  24. International Working Group on Education (IWGE). (1999), Disadvantage, dialogue and development cooperation in education, UNESCO/International Institute for Educational Planning, Paris.Google Scholar
  25. Kelly, M.J. (1998), Primary Education in a Heavily Indebted Poor Country — The Case of Zambia in the 1990s, A report prepared for OXFAM and UNICEF.Google Scholar
  26. Kulpoo, D. (1998), The quality of primary education: Some policy suggestions based on a survey of schools — Mauritius. SACMEQ policy research: Report No. 1, UNESCO/International Institute for Educational Planning Paris.Google Scholar
  27. Lachaud, J-P. (1994), The labour market in Africa, International Institute for Labour Studies, Geneva.Google Scholar
  28. Machingaidze, T., Pfukani, P.; Shumba, S. (1998), The quality of education: Some policy suggestions based on a survey of schools — Zimbabwe. SACMEQ policy research: Report No. 3, UNESCO/International Institute for Educational Planning, Paris.Google Scholar
  29. Napon, A. (1997), Evaluation quantitative et qualitative de 7 CEBNF au Burkina Faso.Google Scholar
  30. Nassor, S.; Mohammed, K. A. (1998), The quality of primary education: Some policy suggestions based on a survey of schools — Zanzibar, SACMEQ policy research: Report No. 4, UNESCO/International Institute for Educational Planning, Paris.Google Scholar
  31. Negash, T. (1996), Rethinking education in Ethiopia. Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Reprocentralen HSC, Uppsala, Sweden.Google Scholar
  32. Nkamba, M.; Kanyika, J. (1998), The quality of primary education: Some policy suggestions based on a survey of schools — Zambia, SACMEQ policy research: Report No. 5, UNESCO/International Institutute for Educational Planning, Paris.Google Scholar
  33. Nzouankeu, J. M. (1994), “Decentralization and democracy in Africa”. In International Review of Administrative Sciences, 60 (2).Google Scholar
  34. Psacharopoulos, G. (1988), “Critical issues in education: A world agenda”. In International Journal of Educational Development, 8 (1).Google Scholar
  35. Saito, M. (1998), “Gender vs. socio-economic status and school location differences in grade 6 reading literacy in five African countries”. In: Studies in Educational Evaluation, 24 (3).Google Scholar
  36. Shenkut, M. K.; Leka, W.; Admassie, A. (1997), Provision of non-formal alternatives for the expansion of educational services, Addis Education, Training and Development Consultants, Addis Ababa.Google Scholar
  37. United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) — Africa. (1998), Progress Against Poverty in Africa, UNDP, New York.Google Scholar
  38. United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO). (1998), World education report — 1998, UNESCO, Paris.Google Scholar
  39. United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO). (1995), World education report — 1995, UNESCO, Paris.Google Scholar
  40. United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation/Bureau Régional de l’Education en Afrique (UNESCO/BREDA). (1997), Report on the state of education in Africa — 1997: Challenges and reconstruction, UNESCO/BREDA, Dakar, Senegal.Google Scholar
  41. United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF). (1999), The state of the world’s children — 1999, United Nations Children’s Fund, New York.Google Scholar
  42. Voigts, F. (1998), The quality of primary education: Some policy suggestions based on a survey of schools — Namibia, SACMEQ policy research: Report No. 2, UNESCO/International Institute for Educational Planning, Paris.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Atchoarena
    • 1
  • Steven J. Hite
    • 2
  1. 1.International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP)UNESCOParis
  2. 2.Brigham Young UniversityUtahUSA

Personalised recommendations