Thermal Properties Studied on As2Se3 Model Glass

  • E. Černošková
  • Z. Černošek
  • J. Holubová
Part of the NATO Science Series book series (NAII, volume 9)

Abstract

Non-crystalline materials, which include some inorganic and organic glasses, are characterized by lack of long range order. This fact is responsible for lots of physical and chemical properties, which opens broad possibility for technical applications. Glasses show glass transition, relaxation effects and crystallization under heat treatment with very similar phenomenological peculiarities. Attention has been paid to effects called physical aging. The study of molecular reorganization during aging has not only fundamental scientific importance but it can have an impact on possible technological advances in material science and engineering.

Keywords

Entropy Crystallization Sulfide Enthalpy Arsenic 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Cortés, P., Montserrat, S. (1989) Effect of previous thermal history on physical aging of poly(ethylenterephtalate), Makromol.Chem.Macromol Symp. 27, 279–287.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Ichikawa, K., (1992) The effect of annealing on the structure of Ge20Te80 glass: atomic-scale imaging using a scanning tunneling microscope, J.Non-Ctyst Solids 150,435-439.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Malek, J. (1998) Dilatometric study of structural relaxation in arsenic sulfide glass, Thermochim. Acta 311, 183–198.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Ribelles, J.L.G, Garayo, A.V., Cowie, J.M.G., Ferguson, R., Harris, S., McEwen, I.J. (1998) The length of cooperativity at the glass transition in poly(vinyl acetate) from the modeling of the structural relaxation process, Polymer 40, 183–192.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Brophy, J.H., Rose, M.R., Wulff, J. (1967) Structure and Properties of Materials: Volume II Thermodynamic of Structure, John Wiley & Sons, New York.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Henderson, D.W., Ast, D.G. (1984) Viscosity and crystallization kinetics of As2Se3, J. Non-Cryst. Solids 64, 43–70.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Brophy, J.H., Rose, R.M., Wulff, J. in: Structure and Properties of Materials, vol. II, Thermodynamics of Structure, John Wiley & Sons, New York (1967), 106.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Mora, M.T. Chalcogenide glasses in: M.F. Thorpe, M.I. Mitkova, (eds.), Amorphous Insulators and Semiconductors NATO ASI Series, vol 23, Kluwer Academic Publishers, London (1997), pp. 45–69.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Málek, J. (1995) The applicability of Johnson-Mehl-Avrami model in the thermal analysis of the crystallization kinetics of glasses, Thermochim. Acta 267 61–73.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Wagner, C, Vázques, J., Dominguez, M., Villares, P., Jiménez-Garay, R. (1996) Analysis of the crystallization kinetics in the semiconducting glassy alloy Cuo.2oAso.35Teo 45, Materials Chemistry and Physics 43, 227–232.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Christian, J.W. (1975) The Theory of Transformation in Metals and Alloys, 2nd Edition, Pergamon Press, London.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Henderson, D.W. (1979) Experimental analysis of non-isothermal transformations involving nucleation and growth, J. Therm Anal. 15, 325–331.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Yinnon, H.S., Uhlmann, D.R. (1983) Applications of thermoanalytical techniques to the study of crystallization kinetics in glass-forming liquids. Parti: Theory, J.Non.-CrystSolids 54, 253–275.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Avrami, M. (1939) Kinetics of phase change L, J.Phys.Chem. 7, 1103–112.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Avrami, M. (1939) Kinetics of phase change H, J.Phys.Chem. 8, 212–224.Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Sestak, J., Berggren, G. (1971) Study of kinetics of mechanism of solid state reactions at increasing temperature, Thermochim. Acta 3, 1–7.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. Černošková
    • 1
  • Z. Černošek
    • 2
  • J. Holubová
    • 2
  1. 1.Joint Laboratory of Solid State Chemistry of Acad. Sci. of the Czech Republic and University of PardubicePardubiceCzech Republic
  2. 2.Department of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical TechnologyUniversity of PardubicePardubiceCzech Republic

Personalised recommendations