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Abstract

The relationship between learning and hardwired behavioral tendencies is particularly complex and controversial in aggressive behavior. We use this challenging case to test a connectionist ‘neural net adaptive control’ model (NNAC): Can it model and predict aggressive behavior in the Siamese fighting fish,Betta splendensl During our initial experimental tests of some predictions of the NNAC model for aggression, we have uncovered behavioral phenomena which calibrate aggressiveness so it becomes more appropriate to the individual fish’s social environment. We have studied some processes which reinforce aggressive responses to particular stimuli (learning phenomena), and others which alter the general level of aggressiveness to many stimuli (motivational phenomena). This paper presents some features of the NNAC model, some of the behavioral phenomena we have studied, and some of the assumptions of the connectionist approach to modeling behavioral adaptiveness.

Keywords

Adaptive Behavior Final Strength Neural Firing Stimulus Situation Connectionist Approach 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Janet R. R. Halperin

There are no affiliations available

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