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Fine Tuning the Surface Roughness of Powder Blasted Glass Surfaces

  • H. Wensink
  • S. Schlautmann
  • M. H. Goedbloed
  • M. C. El Wenspoek
Conference paper

Abstract

Powder blasting is a fast and inexpensive directional etch technique for brittle materials like glass, silicon and ceramics. This new micromachining technique is currently extensively used for μ-fluidic devices [1][2]. However, unfamiliarity with this technique sometimes causes a hesitation to use it, especially due to the uncertainty about the effect of the rough surface on the device performance [3]. It is e.g. supposed that the roughness increases the electro-osmotic flow, fluidic mixing and hence the dispersion, although it has not been shown yet. Therefore it is important to be able to manipulate the roughness and study its effect on device performance. This paper shows how the roughness of a powder blasted surface can be controlled by process parameters, or changed with post treatments, both quantitatively and qualitatively.

Keywords

Surface Roughness Etch Rate Radial Crack Lateral Crack Particle Kinetic Energy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Wensink
    • 1
  • S. Schlautmann
    • 1
  • M. H. Goedbloed
    • 1
  • M. C. El Wenspoek
    • 1
  1. 1.MESA+ Research InstituteUniversity of TwenteEnschedeThe Netherlands

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