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Workplace Trainers in Action: Their Role in Building a Training/Learning Culture

  • Roger Harris
  • Michele Simons

Abstract

Australia, like many other countries, has witnessed a decade of training reform. One of the most important outcomes of this training reform has been the (re)-claiming of the work site as a legitimate learning environment. Government reform has gradually been shifting the balance from a supply to a demand-driven system of vocational education and training (VET). In this move to de-institutionalise training, workplace trainers are being expected to assume an increasingly critical role in the provision of training opportunities. The key issue is to what extent workplace trainers (especially in small business) are ready, willing and able to meet this enhanced commitment.

Keywords

Small Business Informal Learning Workplace Learning External Provider Real Estate Industry 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Roger Harris
    • 1
  • Michele Simons
    • 2
  1. 1.Centre for Research in Eduction, Equity and WorkUniversity of South AustraliaAdelaideAustralia
  2. 2.School of EducationUniversity of South AustraliaAdelaideAustralia

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