Advertisement

Large-Scale ECR-CVD Preparation of Integrated Thin-Film Structures For Space Applications

  • Roman V. Kruzelecky
  • Asoke K. Ghosh
  • Ethel Poiré
  • Darius Nikanpour
Conference paper
Part of the Space Technology Proceedings book series (SPTP, volume 4)

Abstract

ECR plasma discharges, with their characteristic high activation of reactive precursors and low ion energies, have facilitated new deposition chemistries, as well as the low-temperature processing of more delicate substrate materials. MPBT, with the assistance of the Canadian Space Agency, has extended the many positive attributes of ECR plasma-processing to the handling of large, flexible substrates such as those required by the space industry.

ECR processing can be employed to tailor the surface characteristics of existing space materials such as Kapton and Teflon. facilitating better optimization of the design of space craft. Since coatings such as dense SiO2 do not exhibit reliable adhesion when directly applied to plastics due to interfacial stress, MPBT has devoted considerable effort to develop a proprietary process that facilitates the adhesion of high-quality ECR-CVD SiO2 through covalent bonding to various polymers and resins including Kapton, Polycarbonate, Teflon and even fiberglass in an integrated thin-film structure. A broad range of thin-film structures can be prepared by ECR-CVD to meet various space requirements such as AO-resistance, thermal control and electrostatic protection. An overview is presented of ECR-CVD, the relevant plasma diagnostics, and the preparation of large-scale ECR-CVD thin-film structures for space applications. Experimental results are presented on the wear-resistance, VUV AO-resistance, and thermal characteristics of ECR-CVD SiO2 thin-film structures on Teflon and Kapton.

Keywords

Electron Cyclotron Resonance Optical Emission Spectrum Canadian Space Agency Atomic Oxygen Exposure Reliable Adhesion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    R.C. Tennyson and W.D. Morison, Proceedings TMS Symposium on “Space Environmental effects on Materials”, Anaheim, California, Feb., (1990).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    D.L. Smith and AS. Alimanda, J. Electrochem Soc., 1, 1496, (1993).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    K. Shirai and S. Gonda, J. Appl. Phys., 67, 6281, (1990).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    R.V. Kruzelecky, J. Blezius and AK. Ghosh, Proceedings of the 3-rd International Conference on “Protection of Materials and Structures from the LEO Space Environment,” Toronto, Canada (J.I. Kleiman and R.C. Tennyson, eds.) Kluwer Academic Publishers, 155–165, (1999).Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Y. Manabe and T. Mitsuyu, J. Appl. Phys., 66, 2475, (1989).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    P. Shufflebotham, M. Weise, D. Pirkle and D. Denison, “Biased Electron Cyclotron Resonance Chemical-Vapor Deposition of Silicon Dioxide Inter-Metal Dielectric Thin Films,” in “Plasma Properties, Deposition and Etching,” eds. J.J. Pouch and SA Alterovitz, Materials Science Forum, vol. 140–142, 255–268, (1993).Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    R.W.S. Pearce and AG. Gaydon, “The Identification of Molecular Spectra,” Chapman&Hall, London, 241–245, (1985).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Roman V. Kruzelecky
    • 1
  • Asoke K. Ghosh
    • 1
  • Ethel Poiré
    • 2
  • Darius Nikanpour
    • 2
  1. 1.Space and Special Products DivisionMPB Technologies Inc.Pointe Claire
  2. 2.Space TechnologiesCanadian Space AgencySaint-Hubert

Personalised recommendations