Advertisement

Overview of the Mountain Aquifer

A Shared Israeli-Palestinian Resource
  • Yoav Harpaz
  • Marwan Haddad
  • Shaul Arlosoroff
Part of the Natural Resource Management and Policy book series (NRMP, volume 18)

Abstract

The most important groundwater resource shared by Israelis and Palestinians is the Mountain Aquifer. It underlies the central mountain ridge stretching along a north-south axis for some 150 km through Israel and the West Bank. The aquifer extends from the valleys of Yezre’el (Marj Bani Amr) and Beit She’an (Beisan), in the north, to near Beer Sheva (Beer Al-Sabeaa), in the south, and from under the Mediterranean coastal plain and the western foothills, in the west, to the Jordan Rift Valley in the east (Figure 1).1

Keywords

Rift Valley Western Basin Eastern Basin Million Cubic Meter Beer Sheva 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Amiran D., 1995, Rainfall and Water Management in Semi Arid Climates: Israel as an Example, The Jerusalem Institute for Israel Studies, Research Report No. 18, Jerusalem.Google Scholar
  2. EXACT, 1998, Overview of Middle East Water Resources, USGS, Washington D.C.Google Scholar
  3. Gutman Y. and Zukerman H., 1995, Flow Model of the Eastern Basin of Judea and Samaria Mountains, TAHAL, Tel Aviv (in Hebrew).Google Scholar
  4. Gutman Y. and Zukerman H., 1995, Yarkon-Taninim-Beer Sheva Basin-Flow and Salinity Model, TAHAL, Tel Aviv (in Hebrew).Google Scholar
  5. Gvirtzman H., 1994, Groundwater Allocation in Judea and Samaria, in J. Isaac and H. Shuval (eds.), Water and Peace in the Middle East, Elsevier.Google Scholar
  6. Haddad M., 1990, State of the Environment in the Occupied Territories, Paper presented at the Conference on the management of the Environment in the Mediterranean, Nicosia, April.Google Scholar
  7. Harpaz Y., Sterenau R., Mercado A., Schwarz J. and Bear J., 1968, Underground Water Storage Project, TAHAL and FAO, Tel Aviv.Google Scholar
  8. Harpaz Y., 1988, The National Water Master Plan — The Water Resources Supply, TAHAL Tel Aviv (in Hebrew).Google Scholar
  9. Harpaz Y, Schwarz J., Ben Shabat J. and Bieda U., 1995, Israel’s Water Balance, EWRE and TAHAL, Haifa (in Hebrew).Google Scholar
  10. Hydrological Service, 1999, Development, Exploitation and Situation of Water Resources in in Israel 1998, Jerusalem.Google Scholar
  11. Michigan U., Hebrew U. and PCG, 1998, Environmental Protection of the Shared Israeli-Palestinian Mountain Aquifer.Google Scholar
  12. Orni E. and Efrat E., 1973, The Geography of Israel.Google Scholar
  13. Weinberger G., Rosental E., Ben-Zvi A. and Zeitoun D.G., 1994, The Yarkon-Taninim Groundwater Basin, Israel Hydrogeology: Case Study and Critical Review, J. Hydrology 161.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yoav Harpaz
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Marwan Haddad
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Shaul Arlosoroff
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  1. 1.Water Resource PlanningRamat HasharonIsrael
  2. 2.College of EngineeringAn-Najah National UniversityNablusEast Jerusalem
  3. 3.Palestinian Territory and the Palestine Consultancy Group (PCG)Jerusalem
  4. 4.The Harry S Truman Institute for the Advancement of PeaceThe Hebrew University of JerusalemMount ScopusJerusalem

Personalised recommendations