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From Adaptive Heuristic to Phylogenetic Perspective: Some Lessons from the Evolutionary Psychology of Emotion

  • Paul E. Griffiths
Part of the Studies in Cognitive Systems book series (COGS, volume 27)

Abstract

This chapter contrasts an approach that stresses the reconstruction of phylogenetic trajectories and in which the role of adaptation is inseparable from that of history with the adaptationist program as outlined by contemporary evolutionary psychologists. The phylogenetic perspective I advocate will allow evolutionary psychology to conduct more rigorous, quantitative tests of adaptive hypotheses and hence establish properly corroborated theories concerning the evolution of mind. Furthermore, the adaptive heuristic, as found in the adaptationist program, has a tendency to send psychologists down blind alleys. I support both these claims with several case studies in actual evolutionary psychology, particularly of the emotions.

Keywords

Evolutionary Psychology Giant Panda Task Description Adaptive Explanation Adaptive Problem 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul E. Griffiths
    • 1
  1. 1.University of PittsburghUSA

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