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Mission Integrity: Contemporary Challenges for Catholic School Leaders: Beyond the Stereotypes of Catholic Schooling

  • Gerald Grace
Chapter
Part of the Springer International Handbooks of Education book series (SIHE, volume 8)

Abstract

It is often assumed that issues to do with Catholic school leadership are relevant only to Catholics and are therefore marginal to mainstream research and literature in the field of educational leadership. This misconception probably arises because of two pervasive and stereotypical views of the nature of Catholic schooling.

Keywords

Mission Statement Educational Leadership Catholic School Educational Mission Mission Integrity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gerald Grace
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of EducationUniversity of LondonEngland

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