Institutionalizing Evaluation in Schools

  • Daniel L. Stufflebeam
Part of the Kluwer International Handbooks of Education book series (SIHE, volume 9)

Abstract

Evaluation, which is the systematic process of assessing the merit and/or worth of a program or other object, is essential to the success of any school or other social enterprise. A functional school evaluation system assesses all important aspects of the school, provides direction for improvement, maintains accountability records, and enhances understanding of teaching, learning, and other school processes. The focus of this chapter is on how schools can institutionalize a sound system of evaluation. Institutionalization of school-based evaluation is a complex, goal-directed process that includes conceptualizing, organizing, funding, staffing, installing, operating, using, assessing, and sustaining systematic evaluation of a school’s operations. The chapter is directed to persons and groups dedicated to improving a current evaluation system or installing a new one. These include school councils, principals, teachers, and those university, government, and service personnel engaged in helping schools increase their effectiveness.

Keywords

Transportation Coherence Assure Peri Triad 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daniel L. Stufflebeam
    • 1
  1. 1.The Evaluation CenterWestern Michigan UniversityUSA

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