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How Pragmatic is Bioethics?

The Case of In Vitro Fertilization
  • Maartje Schermer
  • Jozef Keulartz
Part of the The International Library of Environmental, Agricultural and Food Ethics book series (LEAF, volume 3)

Abstract

In his Birth of Bioethics Al Jonsen describes American pragmatism as the source for some of the most distinctive traits of bioethics (Jonsen, 1998). A similar thesis - that much of the bioethical literature has in fact been developed from a pragmatist model - is defended by various authors in Pragmatic Bioethics (McGee, 1999). For example, Jonathan Moreno claims that in the 1950s and 1960s theologians dominated bioethics but that a shift has taken place since the 1970s towards a more pragmatist orientation. According to Susan M. Wolf (1994) this shift has taken place later. She states that bioethics (as well as health law) has always been an applied and practical discipline, but has only recently witnessed the turn to a truly pragmatist paradigm.

Keywords

Medical Ethic Moral Status Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis Artificial Insemination Freeze Embryo 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Authors and Affiliations

  • Maartje Schermer
  • Jozef Keulartz

There are no affiliations available

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