Geographical Representation of Large and Small Near-Earth Asteroid (NEA) Discoveries and Observations

  • John L. Rema
Part of the Astrophysics and Space Science Library book series (ASSL, volume 287/8/9)

Abstract

Statistics on near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) discovery and follow-up observations as a function of geographical location are presented. The majority of discoveries and follow up observations are made from the northern hemisphere which has the preponderance of facilities. It is suggested that because of the current dearth of observation programs in the southern hemisphere that there are some (high inclination) NEAs less likely to be discovered, tracked, and recovered. To assist in discovering these NEAs and carrying out follow-up (recovery) observations on others, both primary (discovery) and secondary (< 4-m) (follow-up) facilities should be placed in the southern hemisphere and supported by amateur observation follow-up networks. To optimally discover NEAs with orbits inferior to Earth’s, an IR observing satellite should be positioned in an inferior orbit, e.g. between Venus and Mercury. To physically characterize NEOs, additional 2- to 4-m telescopes are needed

Key words

Near-Earth Asteroids (NEAs) geographical distribution 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Bottke, W. F., Jedicke, R, Morbidelli, A., Petit, J. M., Gladman, B., Understanding the Distribution of Near-Earth Asteroids, Science 288, 2190–2194, 2000.Google Scholar
  2. Cellino, A., “Physical Characterization of Near-Earth Objects,” International School of Space Chemistry, Erice, Italy June 17-25, in press 2001.Google Scholar
  3. Gehrels, T. (ed.), “Hazards Due to Asteroids and Comets,” Univ. Ariz. Press, Tucson 1994.Google Scholar
  4. Gehrels, T., A proposal to the United Nations regarding international discovery programs of near-Earth asteroids, 603–605, in “Near-Earth Objects; The United Nations International Conference,” Annals ofthe New York Academy of Sciences, 822, J. Remo (ed.) 1997.Google Scholar
  5. Harris, A. W., Searching for NEAs from Earth or Space in ,“Highlights of Astronomy, II-A, 257–261, J. Andersen ed. 2000.Google Scholar
  6. Harris, A. W., “Evaluation of Ground-Based Optical Surveys for Near-Earth Asteroids,” Planet. Space Sci. 46 283–290, 1998.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Marsden, B. G., Personal communication, 2002.Google Scholar
  8. Rabinowitz, D. L., Bowell, E., Shoemaker, E. M., and Muinonen, K., Population of Earth Crossing Asteroids, in “Hazards Due to Asteroids and Comets,” Univ. Ariz. Press, Tucson, Gehrels, T. (ed) 1994.Google Scholar
  9. Rabinowitz, D. Bowell, E., Lawrence, K., and Pravdo, S., A Reduced Estimate of the Number of Kilometer Sized Near-Earth Asteroids, Nature 403, 165–166, 2000.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Remo, J. L., Classifying and Modeling NEO material properties and interactions, in ,“Hazards Due to Asteroids and Comets,” 537–550, Univ. Ariz. Press, Tucson, Gehrels, T. (ed) 1994.Google Scholar
  11. Remo, J. L. Policy Perspectives from the UN International Conference on Near-Earth Objects, Space Policy 12, 13–17 1996.Google Scholar
  12. Remo, J. L. (ed.) Near-Earth Objects; The United Nations International Conference, ,“Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 822,1997.Google Scholar
  13. Remo, J. L. and Haubold, H. J., NEO Scientific and Policy Developments: 1995-2000, Space Policy 17, 213–218, 2001.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Remo, J. L. 2002, Characterizing the Near-Earth Object Hazard and Its Mitigation, Acta Astr. 50,737–746.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Stokes, G. H. and Kostishack, D. F., Technology for the Detection of Near-Earth Objects, in Near-earth Objects, The United Nations International Conference, "Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 822, J. L. Remo (ed.) 1997.Google Scholar
  16. UK Task Force on Potentially Hazardous Near-Earth Objects, 2000.Google Scholar
  17. US Govt. Response to the UK Task Force on Potentially Hazardous Near-Earth Objects, 2001.Google Scholar
  18. Williams, G. V., Personal communication, July, 2000.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • John L. Rema
    • 1
  1. 1.Harvard-Smithsonian Center for AstrophysicsCambridgeUSA

Personalised recommendations