XYZ on a Chip: Nanoscale fabrication, fluidics, and optics directed toward applications within biology and medicine

  • Zhongliang Tang
  • Grace Chao
  • Aurea Tucay
  • Erica Takai
  • Djordje Djukic
  • Mary Laura Lind
  • Clark Hung
  • Edward Guo
  • Alan West
  • Richard Osgood
  • James T. Yardley
Chapter
Part of the NATO Science Series book series (NAII, volume 100)

Abstract

We have developed techniques for fabrication of micro-scale and nano-scale structures in polymeric media and we have developed methodology for control of fluid flow within these systems. We have also developed methods for modeling fluid flow in these systems under both electrokinetically driven and hydrostatically driven conditions. These capabilities offer new opportunities for exploration of biological function in many systems. We have illustrated these capabilities for in vitro studies by examination of the influence of medium composition and flow rate on the growth of cells by studying cell volume and shape changes of chondrocyte cells and ACL fibroblast cells at regulated osmotic loadings close to physiological frequencies. We have also demonstrated the development of an artificial medium for study of the kinetics and biological function of biological cells with specific application to understanding the function of osteocyte and osteoblast cells within the bone structures. These experiments demonstrate the efficacy of new generations of bio-chips for studies of biological function.

Keywords

Hydrolysis Sucrose Convection Platinum Electrophoresis 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Beebe, D., Wheeler, M., Zeringue, H., Walters, E., and Raty, S. (2002) Microfluidic technology for assisted reproduction Theriogenology 57, 125–135.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Erickson, G.R., Alexopoulos, L.G., and Guilak, F. (2001) Hyper-osmotic stress induces volume change and calcium transients in chondrocytes by transmembrane, phospholipid, and G-protein pathways Journal of Biomechanics 34, 1527–1535.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Lorenz, H., Despont, M., Fahmni, N., Brugger, J., Vettiger, P., and Renaud, P. (1998) High-aspect-ratio, ultrathick, negative-tone near-UV photoresist and its applications for MEMS Sensors and Actuators a-Physical 64 (1), 33–39.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Hong, S., Tang, Z., Djukic, D., Tucay, A., Bakhru, S., Osgood, R., Yardley, J., West, A.C., and Modi, V. (2001) Simulation and experimental validation of electroosmotic flow in a microfluidic channel 2001 Microelectromechanical Systems Conference, California, 73–76.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Tang, Z., Hong, S., Djukic, D., Modi, V., West, A.C., Yardley, James T., and Osgood, R. (in press) Electrokinetic Flow Control for Composition Modulation in a Microchannel Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Ocvirk, G., Munroe, M., Tang, T., Oleschuk, R., Westra, K., and Harrison, D. J. (2000) Electrokinetic control of fluidflow in native poly(dimethylsiloxane) capillary electrophoresis devices Electrophoresis 21 (1), 107–115.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Locascio, L. E., Perso, C. E., and Lee, C. S. (1999) Measurement of electroosmotic flow in plastic imprinted microfluid devices and the effect of protein adsorption on flow rate Journal of Chromatography A 857 (1–2), 275–284.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Bird, Byron R., Stewart, Warren E., and Lightfoot, Edwin N. (1960) Transport Phenomena. Wiley, New York.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Chao, Grace, Tang, Zhongliang, Angelini, Elsa, West, Alan, and Hung, Clark (Accepted) A novel microfluidic device to study the real-time response of cultured cells to applied dynamic osmotic loading 49th Annual Meeting of the Orthopaedic Research Society, New Orleans, LA, Feb 2003.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Palmer, G. D., Chao, P. H. G., Raia, F., Mauck, R. L., Valhmu, W. B., and Hung, C. T. (2001) Time-dependent aggrecan gene expression of articular chondrocytes in response to hyperosmotic loading Osteoarthritis and Cartilage 9 (8), 761–770.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zhongliang Tang
    • 1
  • Grace Chao
    • 2
  • Aurea Tucay
    • 3
  • Erica Takai
    • 2
  • Djordje Djukic
    • 3
  • Mary Laura Lind
    • 1
  • Clark Hung
    • 2
  • Edward Guo
    • 2
  • Alan West
    • 1
  • Richard Osgood
    • 3
  • James T. Yardley
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Chemical EngineeringColumbia UniversityNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Department of Biomedical EngineeringColumbia UniversityNew YorkUSA
  3. 3.Department of Electrical EngineeringColumbia UniversityNew YorkUSA

Personalised recommendations