ECSCW 2003 pp 355-374 | Cite as

Moving to get aHead: Local Mobility and Collaborative Work

  • Jakob E. Bardram
  • Claus Bossen
Conference paper

Abstract

Local mobility is a central aspect of collaborative work that is in need of close analysis. Between the face-to-face interaction of offices or control rooms and long-distance interaction facilitated through e.g. telephones, e-mail, the www or teleconferences lie a number of work-settings in which actors move about continuously in order to accomplish their work. They do so because they need to get access to knowledge, resources, persons and/or places. We analyze the integral nature of mobility to this kind of work practice from the ethnographic description of a hospital department, and the challenges that actors have to face to accomplish their work. Based on this ethnographic case, we propose a set of concepts for understanding local mobility as an intermediate field of distributed cooperation between centres of coordination and remote collaboration. Finally, we introduce the concept of ‘mobility work’ as complementary to the concept of ‘articulation work’.

Keywords

Fermentation Transportation 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Bardram, J. (2000): ‘Temporal Coordination. On Time and Coordination of Collaborative Activities at a Surgical Department.’, Computer Supported Cooperative Work, vol. 9, pp 157–187.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Bellotti, V. and S. Bly (1996): ‘Walking away from the Desktop Computer: Distributed Collaboration and Mobility in a Product Design Team.’, in M. S. Ackerman (ed.): Proceeding of the Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work 1996, pp209–218.Google Scholar
  3. Bergqvist, J., P. Dahlberg, F. Ljungberg, and S. Kristoffersen (1999): ‘Moving out of the Meeting Room’, in S. Bødker, M. Kyng and K. Schmidt (eds.): Proceedings of the Sixth European Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work, Netherlands, Kluwer Academic Publishers, pp81–98.Google Scholar
  4. Bertelsen, O. W. and S. Bødker (2001): ‘Cooperation in massively distributed Information Spaces’, in W. Prinz, M. Jarke, Y. Rogers, K. Schmidt and V. Wulf (eds.): Proceedings of the Seventh European Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work, Netherlands, Klüver Academic Publishers, pp1–17.Google Scholar
  5. Bossen, C. (2002): ‘The Parameters of Common Information Spaces: the Heterogeneity of Cooperative Work at a Hospital Ward’, in Proceedings of the Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2002, New Orleans, ACM, pp 176–186.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Bowers, J., G. Button, and W. Sharrock (1995): ‘Workflow from Within and Without: Technology and Cooperative Work on the Print Industry Shopfloor’, in H. Marmolin, Y. Sundblad and K. Schmidt (eds.): Proceedings of the Fourth European Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work, Dordrecht, Kluwer Academic Publishers, pp51–66.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Cicourel, A. V. (1990): ‘The Integration of Distributed Knowledge in Collaborative Medical Diagnosis’, in J. Galegher, E. Kraut and C. Egido (eds.): Intellectual Teamwork, Hillsdale, NJ, Lawrence Earlbaum, pp221–242.Google Scholar
  8. Fagrell, H., F. Ljungberg, and S. Kristoffersen (1999): ‘Exploring Support for Knowledge Management in Mobile Work’, in S. Bodker, M. Kyng and K. Schmidt (eds.): Proceedings of the Sixth European Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work, Netherlands, Kluwer Academic Publishers, pp259–275.Google Scholar
  9. Glaser, B. G. and A. Strauss (1967): The Discovery of Grounded Theory: Strategies for Qualitative Research, Chicago, Aldine.Google Scholar
  10. Hutchins, E. (1995): Cognition in the Wild, Cambridge Mass. & London, MIT Press.Google Scholar
  11. Kristofferson, S. and T. Rodden (1996): ‘Working by Walking Around. Requirements of flexible Interaction Management in Video-supported Collaborative Work’ in B. Spence and R. Winder (eds.): Proceedings of Human Computer Interaction, Springer Verlag, pp315–329.Google Scholar
  12. Luff, P. and C. Heath (1998): ‘Mobility in Collaboration’, in Proceeding of the ACM 1998 Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work, pp305–314.Google Scholar
  13. Nielsen, C. and A. Søndergaard (2000): ‘Designing for Mobility — an integration approach supporting multiple technologies’, in Proceedings of the 1 st Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction (CD-rom). Available at http://www.daimi.au.dk/~sorsha
  14. Prior, L. (1988): ‘The Architecture of the Hospital: a Study of Spatial Organization and Medical Knowledge’, British Journal of Sociology, vol. 39, issue 1, pp 85–113.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Reddy, M. and P. Dourish (2002): ‘A Finger on the Pulse: Temporal Rhythms and Information Seeking in Medical Work’, in Proceedings of the Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2002, New Orleans, ACM Press, pp344–353.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Schmidt, K. and L. Bannon (1992): ‘Taking CSCW seriously: supporting Articulation Work’, Computer Supported Cooperative Work, vol. 1, issue 1, pp7–40.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Schmidt, K. and C. Simone (1996): ‘Coordination Mechanisms: towards a Conceptual Foundation of CSCW Systems Design’, Computer Supported Cooperative Work, vol. 5, pp 155–200.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Strauss, A., S. Fagerhaugh, B. Suszek, and C. Weiner (1985): Social Organization of Medical Work, Chicago & London, University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  19. Tellioglu, H. and I. Wagner (2001): ‘Work Practices Surrounding PACS: the Politics of Space in Hospitals’, Computer Supported Cooperative Work, vol. 10, issue 2, pp 163–188.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Vallgårda, S. (1992): Sygehuse og sygehuspolitik i Danmark. Et bidrag til det spécialiserede sygehusvœsens historie 1930–1987, Kobenhavn, Juristog Økonomforbundets Forlag.Google Scholar
  21. Zerubavel, E. (1979): Patterns of Time in Hospital Life: a Sociological Perspective, Chicago, University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jakob E. Bardram
    • 1
  • Claus Bossen
    • 2
  1. 1.Computer Science DepartmentDenmark
  2. 2.Information and Media ScienceUniversity of AarhusDenmark

Personalised recommendations