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High Resolution North African Cretaceous Stratigraphy: Status

  • R. W. Scott
Conference paper
Part of the NATO Science Series book series (NAIV, volume 28)

Abstract

A key challenge is accurate identification of depositional cycles in the stratigraphic record of Cretaceous carbonate platforms and their precise correlation with cycle reference sections to test their synchroneity. The quantitative stratigraphic technique of graphic correlation creates precise and testable correlation hypotheses by integrating the first (FAD) and last appearance datums (LAD) of fossils and other geologic events. The technique makes no assumptions about the completeness of fossil ranges or zones.

A graphic correlation database from the Aptian through the Turanian is based on 42 sections in the Tethyan Realm [1]. More than 1000 first and last occurrences of ammonites, inoceramids, planktic foraminifers, selected rudists, benthic foraminifers, nannofossils, and dinoflagellates are integrated with nearly 100 depositional and geochemical events. Stage boundaries and many standard zones are defined by key taxa in generally accepted reference sections in France, Tunisia, and Texas.

Cretaceous platform ecosystems responded to global environmental controls by dramatic changes in species composition, diversity, and abundance. During a 30 m.y. period in the Early Cretaceous the dominant carbonate platform ecosystem changed from corals, algae, and rudists to rudists with minor coral species. This turnover was closely linked with major, global, though subtle, shifts in oceanographie current systems, in water mass chemistry, in nutrient levels, in plate positions, and oceanic volcanism associated with superplume activity. Numerous Cretaceous bioconstructions are known in North Africa and provide essential data for the understanding of processes of origination, growth, and demise of Cretaceous coral-rudist paleocommunities.

Keywords

Western Desert Transgressive System Tract Graphic Correlation Carbonate Shelf Planktic Foraminifera 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. W. Scott
    • 1
  1. 1.Precision Stratigraphy AssociatesClevelandUSA

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