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Women in the Academy

Confronting Barriers to Equality
  • Carol S. Hollenshead
Part of the Innovations in Science Education and Technology book series (ISET, volume 15)

Abstract

In the hallway of the Center for the Education of Women hangs a picture of a University of Michigan science class in the 1880s. The students wear somber, formal clothes. The men wear ties; the women, hats. They are separated from one another—the women sit on one side of the aisle, the men on the other. In the picture are 26 men, two of whom are African American, and 11 women, one of whom is African American. As the picture reveals, Michigan was a progressive place in the 1880s. The irony is that, more than 100 years later, in terms of demographics, many science classrooms at most major research universities are likely to look much the same as the one in our picture.

Keywords

Junior Faculty Color Faculty Woman Faculty Occupational Segregation Tenure Track 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carol S. Hollenshead

There are no affiliations available

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