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Conclusions

  • Lilli S. Hornig
  • Barbara Lazarus
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Part of the Innovations in Science Education and Technology book series (ISET, volume 15)

Abstract

When we examine sex differences in any dimension, we inevitably emphasize and perhaps enlarge them. Instead of finding them diminished—over time, or by intervention—we tend to focus on the differences that remain. We are still short of equality, and so we tend to forget that at least we are a lot closer to it than we were. That may be especially true in the academic sphere, where we have a wealth of data and analyses that continue to confirm gender inequality. But they also confirm that we are closer to equality than we were thirty years ago. This volume has dealt with the specifics of some of the remaining inequalities, as well as with potential remedies, allowing us to take a longer-range view of achievements of the past several decades and of the likely propects for the future.

Keywords

Affirmative Action Junior Faculty Female Faculty Woman Faculty Woman Student 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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  • Lilli S. Hornig
  • Barbara Lazarus

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