Application of control methods

  • K-H. Link
  • B. Kranz
  • J. Kroschel
  • Big. Haussmann
  • D. E. Hess
  • H. G. Welz
  • O. Klein
  • A. Jost
  • D. Müller-Stöver
  • H. Thomas
  • A. A. Abbasher
  • M. Vurro
  • V. Portnoy
  • D. M. Joel
Chapter

Abstract

Parasitic weeds have not yet infested all potential areas from the ecological point of view. Therefore, further spread has to be avoided. The seed of Striga, Orobanche, Cuscuta and Alectra are disseminated by wind, water, cattle, machinery and contaminated crop seed. One can distinguish between short distance movement and long distance movement. Without intention of doing so, dissemination is greatly supported by man. This holds true especially in the case of Cuscuta. Due to the high reproductive capacity of most parasitic weeds and the difficulties of their control the threshold level is set to <1 plant/field.

Keywords

Burning Maize Germinate Syria Resis 

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Literature

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • K-H. Link
  • B. Kranz
  • J. Kroschel
  • Big. Haussmann
  • D. E. Hess
  • H. G. Welz
  • O. Klein
  • A. Jost
  • D. Müller-Stöver
  • H. Thomas
  • A. A. Abbasher
  • M. Vurro
  • V. Portnoy
  • D. M. Joel

There are no affiliations available

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