Calluna and its Associated Species: Some Aspects of Co-Existence in Communities

  • C. H. Gimingham
Conference paper

Abstract

In recent years, research concerned with plant communities has been focussed very largely upon the study of variation in floristic composition, and its causes. In this paper, however, a complementary approach is adopted - that which considers the mechanisms of community organization and the ability of certain species to co-exist within a community. An attempt is made to identify some of the characteristics or properties of these species which either make them intolerant of the company of certain other species as neighbours, or on the contrary confer an ability to co-exist in this way. Conversely, some characteristics or properties of stands and communities which tend either to permit or prevent invasion by species not originally present, are also touched upon.

Keywords

Co-existence Complementary strategies Heath communities 

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Copyright information

© Dr. W. Junk bv Publishers 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. H. Gimingham
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BotanyUniversity of AberdeenAberdeenGreat Britain

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