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Implication Reversal in a Natural Language

  • Gilles Fauconnier
Chapter
Part of the Synthese Language Library book series (SLAP, volume 4)

Abstract

Much recent work about language has been representational: the solution of particular problems and the account of linguistic distributions is often perceived as being the choice (or the discovery) of abstract representations (e.g., semantic, syntactic, logical…) which reflect directly, largely by means of their configurations, properties and generalizations only dimly apparent at the ‘surface’. Of course, rules are necessary to relate these representations to the actually observed manifestations of language and the form of these rules, like that of the representations, is considered to be a question of crucial importance in linguistic theory.

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Copyright information

© D. Reidel Publishing Company, Dordrecht, Holland 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gilles Fauconnier
    • 1
  1. 1.C.N.R.S.ParisFrance

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